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  Cheapest Cities To Live In 

  Cheapest Cities To Live In 

  Cheapest Cities To Live In 

/ Life Styles / Wednesday, 16 August 2017 19:02

A lot of people dream about picking up their lives and moving to some foreign country where house rent is less than a car payment and there is still enough fun to keep the home-sick feeling away.  Like all fantasies though it might actually be affordable, only a handful of people actually take that trip.

Things like "do I need a language lesson?", "is the food delicious?" or "how homely does it feel?" are worth considering besides rent when you consider a move to a far-away town. Mess up these answers and your fantasy becomes one stressful experience you end up where you started before a Despacito  track loops twice. Whether you are planning to retire, start afresh or just looking around, these places will appeal to you.

I present to you the world's cheapest places to live in 2017.


Hoi An, Vietnam

Definitely South East Asia's most popular and gorgeous place to visit. Impressively well preserved, this ancient town will allure you with its rich history and culture coupled with its delicious eateries and friendly people, you will be entirely blown away with what this "home away from home" has to offer. The down side is that English speakers are rare.


Koh Phi Phi, Thailand

Thai's island-superstar, it is a hot topic of discussion for travelers all over Thailand, It has been in the movies. In Phi Phi there's no schedule, no hustle-and-bustle. this is one of the few places where the people are laid-back and receptive. Even with all the hype, it never disappoints - if in doubt ask those that have approached the island by boat. Life is cheap and easy in Phi.


Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, Spain

The cleanest air of any Spanish city, because Gran Canaria is in the middle of the ocean, and because the Trade Winds constantly renew the air, Las Palmas has the cleanest air of any Spanish city. This city ranks high on the list of "pleasant climate" cities coupled with its low tax rates, if you’re moving to Gran Canaria to start a business, you may be able to benefit from one of Europe’s lowest tax regimes.


Panama City, Panama

you definitely don't have to worry about exchanging your dollars to the local currency - Balboa, the USD is openly accepted and try to get cabs away from airports and hotels for cheaper rates, don't forget to pack shorts and sandals if you want to enjoy your time here because it is hot.


St Petersburg, Russia

Saint Petersburg is with no doubt Russia's most westernized city with lots of palaces, monuments, great buildings, bridges, etc. Keep your mind alert, as you could walk a street a hundred times and still discover a new thing every trip. Located in the North of the country, it is considered to be the gateway to the rest of the world in terms of trade, finance and industry. The cold temperature can be pretty nasty.


Warsaw, Poland

For many people searching for education and job opportunities, Warsaw offers just that and more. At over 1.7 million inhabitants, it is a business city and bubbling with vibrant spirit and constitutes an important cultural and scientific center. the economic power of this city peaks due to numerous foreign investments, coupled with a great number of internationally recognized universities and research institutes makes it a student’s friendly atmosphere.


Nairobi, Kenya

I can't think of any African city other than Nairobi that has the largest expatriate population, this is because of the many NGOs serving the neighboring countries like Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia. Nairobi is the headquarters of the UNDP and many international staff are stationed there. Cost of living is low, unlike many other global cities, life in Nairobi is not costly and the best part is that it is authentically African with a blend of western culture, eastern culture and everything in between. Even when it is 3am, Nairobi will still be there for you.


 New Delhi, India

New Delhi is considered the most expensive city in India according to Mercer, but the rest of the world consider it the second most inexpensive. India relaxed its long-term visa requirements and even when your passport expires, you can get it renewed hassle free, The number of educated people in the labor pool is vast (mostly for technical work) and there's plenty of calm places to live. Though there's more than 20 languages spoken throughout India, English serves as a common lingo, here are a few Hindi phrases will definitely help break the iciness: "Namaskar" (hello), "shukriya" (thank you), "aap kaise hai" (how are you), "kitna hai" (how much) and "naam kya hai" (what's your name). India will give you sensory overload if you can handle it.


 Sofia, Bulgaria

I heard the food in Bulgarian is to die for, also just outside the biggest cities you can find decent apartments for as little as $130 USD a month. You're going to have access to all the good life plus its EU membership, which is worth considering for your overall well-being. No matter how attractive the cost of living might be, though, it’s not a good idea to go to Bulgaria without a source of income - Very important.


Timisoara, Romania

In case you want travel to Western Europe more often, then put Timisoara near the top of your list. Timisoara has a lot to offer when it comes to culture, but you kind of have to dig into the city to get to know all the interesting facts and stories. This city has over 13,000 buildings that are declared historical monuments. Very close to the Hungarian border, you can visit most of Western Europe by car and there's also cheap flights to places like Turkey, Dubai, Abu Dhabi etc.


Agadir, Morocco

If you've always wanted to ride a camel, see the desert, explore maze-like medinas, and drink tea with Berbers. Agadir is the place you want to go, seeing the beautiful color of the desert up close and personal, the sound of the wind, camping with Bedouins, and gazing at a million stars with no light pollution makes it all worthwhile at the desert regions, the other parts of the country are just as magical.


Kathmandu, Nepal

Kathmandu is the calpital of Nepal and its biggest city. However, you can choose any city because a lot of people consider this country one of the cheapest places for international living. Living here long term might be challenging though as the electricity is said to be ‘not very reliable’, but if you're making more than $1,800 a month living in Nepal, you're an "elite". Life is still based on the agricultural standard - it starts with the sunrise. Pick the right spot and you get to wake to the sight of million-dollar mountain views every morning. 

 

 

The words 'cheap, inexpensive and affordable' are tossed so easily people have become more skeptic as to what they really apply to. While the saying "you get what you give/pay for" might be a justified position, price does not always equal quality. If You live in any of these cities or want to offer suggestions, I’d really love to hear what you think in the comments below.

 

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